Destiny instantly becomes most popular new gaming franchise (Wired UK)


Destiny
Destiny

The new
game from the makers of Halo is a big hit, for some
reason

© 2014 Activision / Bungie


If you’re an Activision shareholder, today comes with some
exceedingly good news — the publisher’s just-launched sci-fi
shooter Destiny has already sold in $500m (£310m)
worth of the game, making it the most successful new gaming
franchise of all time. If you’re a gamer enjoying it, it’s pretty
good news too, as it essentially guarantees future instalments.

Normally, “big game has sold X” wouldn’t be terribly newsworthy,
but in Destiny’s case, that figure is particularly
auspicious. The game, from Halo creators Bungie, was
reportedly the most expensive ever developed, with $500m being the
figure commonly attributed to its cost. Even though Activision
Publishing CEO Eric Hirshberg confirmed to Wired.co.uk that a substantial chunk of that
included marketing costs, that Destiny  has already
recouped that half-billion dollars is frankly astonishing.

“Based on extraordinary audience demand, retail and first party
orders worldwide have exceeded $500 million for Destiny,” Bobby
Kotick, CEO of Activision Blizzard, said via press release.
However, this figure only represents the value of stock sold to
retailers, rather than a sell through, which would be numbers
bought by consumers. Those figures are yet to be released, as is
whether the game has become instantly profitable as a result.

Perhaps more interesting is that Destiny has also
become the highest selling day-one digital release in console
history, marking a huge swing to virtual purchases of “triple A”
games. Activision’s announcement is unclear on whether digital
sales are included in the $500m figure, or an additional milestone,
but either way it seems the company’s investment in Bungie’s
ambitious vision has already paid off.

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10 September 2014 | 5:16 pm – Source: wired.co.uk

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