Google bans porn in ads (Wired UK)


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As of this week no more adverts incorporating “sexually explicit
content” will be promoted by Google’s advertising network.

Google’s AdWords platform is used to place adverts on
Google-owned sites and other sites can also choose to host AdWord
ads on their own sites. The platform is thought to be responsible
for the majority of Google’s revenue, but although Google has
placed restrictions on adult content for a while, the latest
changes could potentially have chased some advertisers
elsewhere.

According to
CNBC
, Google sent a message to advertisers at the beginning of
June in order to notify them that it will no longer accept ads
“that promote graphic depictions of sexual acts”.It went on to say
that this included content such as hardcore pornography and the
depiction of masturbation and genital, anal, and oral sexual
acts.

“When we make this change, Google will disapprove all ads and
sites that are identified as being in violation of our revised
policy. Our system identified your account as potentially affected
by this policy change. We ask that you make any necessary changes
to your ads and sites to comply so that your campaigns can continue
to run,” the message read.

Google first announced that the changes were coming in March, when it advised users of AdWords
it would be updating its adult sexual services, family status and
underage and non-consensual sex acts policy pages. As well as
prohibiting sexually explicit content, it also took the opportunity
to clarify its guidelines on other adult activities. Adverts for
strip clubs, dating sites and “non-intimate” massage services, for
example, are still allowed, but are subject to tight restrictions
regarding classification.

Some have speculated that the changes signal hard times ahead
for the porn industry, as many companies such as PayPal, Amazon and
Chase Bank have started to disassociate themselves from clients who
work in the adult entertainment industry. According to
CNBC,  351 million Google searches were made
including the words “sex”, “porn”, “free porn” and “porno” were
made during the month May, so whether Google would leave the porn
industry high and dry by instigating even bigger changes in how it
handles the industry is debatable.

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Source: wired.co.uk
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