Google has evaluated 1.2 million URLs under Right to be Forgotten ruling

Google has revealed the number of URLs it has removed from its search results under the Right to be Forgotten ruling

Google has revealed that it has evaluated 1,235,473 URLs for removal relating to Right to be Forgotten requests since the ruling came into effect in May 2014.

The company has received 348,508 requests to have URLs relating to people’s names and identities stripped form its search results.

Interestingly, 58 percent of the requests Google received did not result in URLs being removed from search results, meaning that only 42 percent of submitted requests were successful.

That trend is reflected at a national level in other countries. Only 38 percent of the 43,150 requests from UK citizens resulted in the removal of the URLs, which totalled 162,559.

This indicates that many requests submitted to Google are not valid under the Right to be Forgotten ruling.

Google also revealed the top sites where URLs have been removed from searhc results relating to an individual who has successfully exercised the Right to be Forgotten.

Top of the list is Facebook, with 10,229 URLs, followed by profileengine.com with 7,997 and groups.google.com with 6,764.

Google also cited examples of how the firm processes Right to be Forgotten requests, highlighting one from the UK.

“After we removed a news story about a minor crime, a newspaper published a story about the removal action,” the company said.

“The Information Commissioner’s Office ordered us to remove the second story from search results for the individual’s name. We removed the page from search results for the individual’s name.”

Google’s transparency about how it processes Right to be Forgotten requests demonstrates that it takes the ruling seriously.

However, Google has hit some stumbling blocks on it way. For example, the BBC publicly posted links to all of the stories that Google has removed from its listings since the Right to be Forgotten came into being, after claiming that it wanted to keep its licence payers informed.

More recently, France clashed with Google by ordering the search company to apply the Right to be Forgotten ruling worldwide rather than on regional databases, something Google has disagreed with.

Google also got itself into hot water when it accidentally published data revealing 95 percent of all Right to be Forgotten requests.

So it would seem that Google still has some work to go before it fully get to grips with the Right to be Forgotten ruling and the way different people and nations expect it to be implemented.

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27 November 2015 | 12:30 pm – Source: v3.co.uk

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